Episode 318: In the previous episode, we explored the shocking murder of Tim Bosma and the subsequent trial that brought two killers to justice. However, their trail of violence did not end there. In this second installment of our three-part series, we delve into the tragic case of Laura Babcock, 23, whose July 2012 disappearance from Toronto was eventually attributed to Dellen Millard and Mark Smich. We’ll learn a bit about Laura’s life and examine the circumstances surrounding her vanishing and the painstaking yet unsuccessful search efforts to uncover her remains. You’ll hear disturbing details that emerged during the trial for her murder, shedding even more light on the twisted dynamics between Millard, Smich, and their unfortunate victim. This episode serves as a prelude to the final chapter, where we’ll explore the most shocking revelation of all, that Dellen Millard also killed his father, Wayne, for his money.

Sources:

Search — Laura Babcock | Toronto Star

Laura Babcock had an intense fear of death since childhood, court hears in murder trial for Dellen Millard and Mark Smich

Laura Babcock had intense fear of death since childhood, court hears

Toronto family receives death certificate years after daughter was murdered

Who was Laura Babcock? A look into her life as the trial into her presumed death continues | CBC News

Dellen Millard, Mark Smich found guilty of murder in Laura Babcock’s death

What the jury didn’t hear in the Laura Babcock murder trial

Laura Babcock, horoscope for birth date 12 February 1989, born in Etobicoke, with Astrodatabank biography

Dec 12, 2019, page A30 – Red Deer Advocate at Newspapers.com

Dec 07, 2017, page 2 – The Toronto Star at Newspapers.com

2015 ONSC 6206 (CanLII) | R. v Millard and Smich | CanLII

2017 ONSC 7584 (CanLII) | R. v. Millard | CanLII

R. v. Ward-Jackson, (2018) O.J. No. 163 | PDF | Sentence (Law) | Crime & Violence

2018 ONSC 178 (CanLII) | R. v. Ward-Jackson | CanLII

2018 ONSC 5602 (CanLII) | R. v. Millard | CanLII

2023 ONCA 418 (CanLII) | R. v. Millard | CanLII

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 317: Tim Bosma, a 32-year-old family man from Ancaster, Ontario, went missing in May 2013 after taking two men for a test drive of his truck. The two men were later identified as Dellen Millard, a 27-year-old heir to a Canadian aviation empire, and Mark Smich, a 24-year-old drug dealer and aspiring rapper. This case would expose the disturbing reality of Millard and Smich’s cold-blooded violence and web of deceit.

The investigation into Bosma’s disappearance was just the beginning of uncovering the harrowing events surrounding Millard and Smich. In 2012, before Bosma’s murder, they had killed Millard’s 23-year-old ex-girlfriend, Laura Babcock. Later that same year, they shockingly took the life of Dellen’s father, Wayne Millard.

As the details of the Tim Bosma case unfold, the stage is set for the equally horrific events of the murders of Laura Babcock and Wayne Millard to come to light in parts 2 and 3 of this true crime series. The disturbing stories of these two killers, Dellen Millard and Mark Smich, reveal a chilling trail of devastation left for the families and communities impacted by their callous acts of violence.

Sources:

Tim Bosma: A timeline of the police investigation and murder trial

Cellphone records to play big role in Tim Bosma murder trial | CBC News

The Murder of Tim Bosma : The Devil Had a Name | CBC News

Kijiji Statement

Millard roommate testifies about visiting hangar on day Bosma disappeared | CBC News

Hundreds attend Tim Bosma memorial service

Wife of Tim Bosma pleads for his safe return – Toronto

Clairmont: Whatever it takes to find Tim Bosma

Hamilton will always remember Tim Bosma

Tim Bosma remembered: father, husband, son and friend | CBC News

Everything We Learned at the Tim Bosma Murder Trial

Tim Bosma: The beginning. and the end

‘We have waited for justice’: Tim Bosma’s widow speaks Millard, Smich guilty verdict | Watch News Videos Online

Tim Bosma Found Dead | Global News | YouTube

Bosma Murder Charge | Global News | YouTube

Search: Dellen Millard | Canadian Legal Information Institute | CanLII

2015 ONSC 6206 (CanLII) | R. v Millard and Smich | CanLII

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 316: On January 18, 1987, 20-year-old University of Victoria student Marguerite Telesford disappeared during a morning jog in Saanich, British Columbia. Her bloody earmuffs, bloodstains, a discharged shotgun shell, and a pry bar were found, suggesting foul play, but her body was never located. In 1989, Scott Ian MacKay was convicted of second-degree murder concerning Telesford’s death despite maintaining his innocence. MacKay had a history of violent assaults on women. Recently, after serving a life sentence, MacKay was controversially granted day parole, raising concerns from the community and victim advocates about public safety risks and his lack of remorse.

Sources:

Marguerite Telesford – Mount Doug Alumni Association

Archive dive: The 1987 murder of a UVic student who vanished on her morning run

The 35th Anniversary of the Saanich Indian Territorial Declaration

Neighbourhood History Tillicum

“Marguerite Telesford” – Search – Newspapers.com™

1988 CanLII 2888 (BC SC) | B.C. (A.G.) v. Pac. Press Ltd. | CanLII

1992 CanLII 5990 (BC CA) | R. v. MacKay | CanLII

Dead Ends: B.C. Crime Stories

CANADA – Marguerite Telesford, Missing since January 18, 1987 from Saanich, Victoria, BC; 2nd degree murder conviction

Jack Knox: Marguerite Telesford murder a story without end

Jan 20, 1987, page 1 – The Vancouver Sun at Newspapers.com

Jan 20, 1987, page 3 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Jan 21, 1987, page 8 – The Leader-Post at Newspapers.com

Jan 22, 1987, page 4 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Jan 23, 1987, page 3 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Apr 14, 1988, page 1 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Apr 21, 1988, page 1 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Jan 19, 1989, page 12 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Jan 19, 1989, page 1 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Jan 19, 1989, page 9 – The Vancouver Sun at Newspapers.com

Jan 25, 1989, page 5 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Jan 25, 1989, page 13 – The Vancouver Sun at Newspapers.com

Jan 26, 1989, page 11 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Jan 28, 1989, page 9 – The Vancouver Sun at Newspapers.com

Feb 02, 1989, page 3 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Feb 04, 1989, page 3 – Edmonton Journal at Newspapers.com

Feb 05, 1989, page 8 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Feb 06, 1989, page 3 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Feb 08, 1989, page 1 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

May 15, 1993, page 1 – Times Colonist at Newspapers.com

Jan 27, 1998, page 2 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Mar 17, 2024, page A4 – The Province at Newspapers.com

Man convicted of murdering UVic student 37 years ago gets day parole

‘Baffling’: B.C. murderer who killed university student granted day parole – BC

High-risk offender to reside in Vancouver – Vancouver Police Department

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 315: Barbara Gayle Stoppel, a 16-year-old waitress, was tragically murdered on December 23, 1981, in the women’s washroom of Ideal Donut Shop in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She was strangled with a twine, and despite being found alive, she succumbed to her injuries after six days on life support. The murder case quickly became notorious not only due to its brutal nature but also because of the wrongful conviction of Thomas Sophonow, who was initially accused of the crime.

Sophonow underwent three separate trials: the first ended with a hung jury, and the second and third led to convictions ultimately overturned by the Manitoba Court of Appeal. The Supreme Court of Canada refused to hear a Crown appeal, leading to Sophonow’s final acquittal. This case is frequently cited as a significant example of a miscarriage of justice involving flawed eyewitness identifications and police misconduct during the interrogation process.

Despite Sophonow’s exoneration, the actual perpetrator remained at large until a re-investigation of the case pointed to another suspect, Terry Arnold, who was already known to police for similar offences, having left a trail of depravity, sexual assaults and suspected murder in his wake. This revelation came too late to be pursued thoroughly, as Arnold died by suicide in 2005.

The impact of this case has been profound, leading to public scrutiny over police procedures and the reliability of eyewitness testimony. It has also been the subject of several books and a public inquiry which sought to prevent such injustices in the future.

Sources:

barbstoppel.com

Thomas Sophonow | Innocence Canada

City of Winnipeg

1984 CanLII 2912 (MB CA) | R. v. Sophonow | CanLII

1984 CanLII 3811 (MB CA) | R. v. Sophonow (No.1) | CanLII

1986 CanLII 104 (MB CA) | R. v. Sophonow (No.2) | CanLII

1999 CanLII 6576 (BC SC) | R. v. Arnold | CanLII

2001 BCCA 374 (CanLII) | R. v. Arnold | CanLII

2005 BCCA 611 (CanLII) | R. v. Arnold | CanLII

Body of suspect in Winnipeg killing found in Victoria

Drifter

Thomas Sophonow Inquiry

Letter of Apology to Tom Sophonow

1bpm85fqb_903420

Stoppel

Exclusive: Thirty years later, survivor details encounter with serial killer Terry Arnold

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 314: Ezra Allen Miner, more commonly known as Bill Miner, was an infamous American stagecoach and train robber born in Michigan in 1846. Bill Miner’s criminal career included an early arrest on April 3, 1866, for robbery, leading to a three-year sentence at San Quentin. Over thirty-five years, Miner was incarcerated for a cumulative total of nearly 30 years, experiencing two official releases and making five escapes from custody. He became infamous in Canada for robbing the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) and securing his status as a legendary figure in Canadian outlaw lore, which included an escape from the B.C. Penitentiary in New Westminster.

Known by nicknames such as “The Grey Fox” and the “Gentleman Bandit,” Miner was celebrated for his courteous demeanour during his heists. Furthermore, he is often credited with popularizing the now-iconic command during robberies, “Hands up!”; however, this may be hyperbole. Miner’s blend of politeness and notoriety helped cement his legacy in the annals of Canadian criminal folklore.

Sources:

This Week in History: 1906 – The legendary outlaw Bill Miner robs a train near Kamloops

Bill Miner | Canadian Cowboy Country Magazine

Bill Miner | The Canadian Encyclopedia

The Grey Fox (1982 film) | The Canadian Encyclopedia

“The Grey Fox” (1982) – Movie on Bill Miner – Western Stagecoach Robber | YouTube

The Grey Fox: The True Story of Bill Miner – Last of the Old-Time Bandits

Billy Miner Pie Recipe

Billy Miner | Mission Museum

Bill Miner | Historica Canada Education Portal

Bill Miner | BC Penitentiary Collection

Bill Miner – The Gentleman Outlaw – Golden BC Museum

Bill Miner | NFB Vignette

Old Bill Miner: Last of the Famous Western Bandits

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 313: Douglas Donald Moore, known in Meadowvale, Ontario,  as a drug supplier for young teens, gained notoriety in Mississauga for killing three young men before taking his own life in his jail cell while awaiting trial on 11 charges for sexual assaults on three boys. Peel Regional Police assert that Robert Grewal, 22, of Meadowvale, and Giuseppe (Joseph) Manchisi, 20, of Milton, who were close friends, were killed in 2003 by Moore. After Moore’s death, he was named the prime suspect in the murders of Grewal and Manchisi. Additionally, police believe Moore was responsible for killing Rene Charlebois, 15, also of Meadowvale.

All three victims disappeared in late 2003, and their bodies were discovered in spring 2004. Charlebois’ remains were found in an Orangeville landfill, while Grewal and Manchisi’s remains were located in wooded areas near Montreal. In 2005, Moore’s former common-law wife and an unidentified 16-year-old were convicted of accessory to murder after the fact. The teen assisted in disposing of evidence, including driving with Moore to Quebec to bury the bodies of Grewal and Manchisi. Moore believed the two men had stolen drugs and cash from him, but it was later revealed that the 16-year-old was responsible for the robbery. The police have never disclosed the motive behind the killing of Rene Charlebois.

Sources:

Mississauga | Canadian Encyclopedia

History of Mississauga | MIssissauga.ca

Canada’s most notorious murder case happened in Mississauga in the 1970s

Improbable Cause: The Harrison Family Murders

Search: Douglas Donald Moore | Newspapers.com

Youth appealing in Manchisi case

Murder victim’s grieving mother still has questions

Dad seeks slain son’s body parts | Toronto Star

Douglas Donald Moore (1968-2004)

Cold North Killers by Lee Mellor | Everand

Douglas Donald Moore | Murderpedia, the encyclopedia of murderers

Opinion: The horrifying path of Douglas Moore

Ontario Newsroom | Coroner’s Inquest

50TH ANNIVERSARY: Notorious Meadowvale serial killer left suicide note

Didn’t know killer’s background, doctor testifies | The Star

Spree killer feared dangerous-offender status | The Star

`I’m sorry … I’m finally free’: Killer | The Star

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 312: In a home in Shediac, New Brunswick, on February 13, 1805, Amos Babcock, driven by delusions of divine mission, subjected his family to a horrifying ordeal. He gathered his wife, children and sister, Mercy, instilling fear with his erratic behaviour and unsettling declarations. Spurred by imagined threats and seeing himself as an instrument of God, Amos prepared for a sacrificial act, treating his family with cruelty dressed up as a religious ritual. His deep descent into madness was evident as he inflicted violence upon his loved ones, sparing none from his erratic wrath. Babcock’s final act of brutality saw him murder his sister, Mercy Babcock Hall, whom he saw as demonic, in a brutal frenzy of madness, bringing a tragic end to a night of unspeakable horror.

Sources:

Amos Babcock (1764-1805) | WikiTree FREE Family Tree

Squash, Pumpkin Pie and Mercy… | Part 1

Squash, Pumpkin Pie and Mercy… | Part 2

New Brunswick — History and Culture

The Babcock Tragedy, a Story of Madness and Murder

Hellfire in Shediac

Amos Babcock… Crazed Murderer, or…?

Full text of “The New Brunswick magazine”

Mar 08, 1939, page 14 – The Montreal Star at Newspapers.com

Apr 13, 1939, page 15 – The Kingston Whig-Standard at Newspapers.com

Jan 18, 1993, page 25 – The Leader-Post at Newspapers.com

Apr 20, 2013, page 79 – National Post at Newspapers.com

The Ballad of Jacob Peck by Debra Komar (Ebook)

Great Awakening – First, Second & Definition

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 311: On October 21, 2021, a tragic accident occurred on the set of the low-budget old-west movie Rust, filmed on a New Mexico ranch. Wife, mother and Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, 42, was fatally shot, and writer/director Joel Souza, 48, was injured. It was the lead actor and producer, Alec Baldwin, who was holding the prop gun that killed Hutchins and wounded Souza. Somehow, it contained a live round. Investigations also revealed other live rounds on set, which is never supposed to happen.

Baldwin and the film’s inexperienced armourer, Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, 24, were charged with involuntary manslaughter. Dave Halls, 63, serving as the first assistant director on the film, entered a no-contest plea per a deal made with prosecutors, accepting responsibility for the misdemeanour offence of negligent use of a deadly weapon linked to the death of Halyna Hutchins. Numerous civil suits have also been filed, with accusations of negligence being levelled against several parties, including the production company, Hannah Gutierrez and actor Alec Baldwin.

Sources:

Halyna Hutchins | IMDb

Joel Souza | IMDb

Rust | Western | IMDb

Alec Baldwin | IMDb

Hannah Gutierrez Reed Probable Cause Statement | DocumentCloud

Halyna Hutchins Post Mortem — 62fc0b327d166.pdf

Alec Baldwin – Halyna Hutchins – FBI and Medical Examiner Reports (Aug 2022)

American Cinematographer January 2022 Ac0122 | PDF | Pixel | Signal Processing

The moment Alec Baldwin is told of the death of his colleague Halyna Hutchins

The New Mexico Film Office Announces Rust is Currently Filming in New Mexico

The day Alec Baldwin shot Halyna Hutchins and Joel Souza

Search warrant reveals grim details of ‘Rust’ shooting and Halyna Hutchins’ final minutes

A Timeline of the ‘Rust’ Shooting and Investigation

‘Rust’ timeline: Key events in the Alec Baldwin on-set shooting

Rust trial: How events unfolded after fatal shooting on Alec Baldwin film set

Raise Funds In Memory of Halyna Hutchins, organized by ICG Local 600

‘Rust’ Camera Assistant on Safety Issues, Pay Irregularities and Producer Behavior on “Brutal” Set

Bonanza Creek Ranch | About

Gun in Fatal Rust Shooting Used in Target Practice that Morning

FULL Alec Baldwin Police Interview About Rust Shooting Incident

Bodycam Released in Alec Baldwin Set Shooting

Alec Baldwin, ‘Rust’ producers reach settlement with slain cinematographer’s estate – National

Video shows ‘Rust’ rehearsal, Baldwin speak to officers after shooting | NewsNation

Halyna Hutchins’s Death on the Set of Rust Was “Not a Freak Accident”

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

In the summer of 2006, a young Calgary woman was on top of the world. She had a supportive family, amazing friends and a great job. But life as she knew it came to an abrupt stop in the middle of the night on August 6, 2006. In this episode, Global News senior crime reporter Nancy Hixt shares details of a violent attack- a story that’s every woman’s worst fear.

http://www.calgarycrimestoppers.org – reference case # 06274598

https://newsroom.calgary.ca/sexual-assault-case-from-2006-has-new-lead/

Contact:

Instagram: @nancy.hixt

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NancyHixtCrimeBeat/

Email: nancy.hixt@globalnews.ca

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Episode 310: On October 21, 2021, a tragic accident occurred on the set of the low-budget old-west movie Rust, filmed on a New Mexico ranch. Wife, mother and Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, 42, was fatally shot, and writer/director Joel Souza, 48, was injured. It was the lead actor and producer, Alec Baldwin, who was holding the prop gun that killed Hutchins and wounded Souza. Somehow, it contained a live round. Investigations also revealed other live rounds on set, which is never supposed to happen.

Baldwin and the film’s inexperienced armourer, Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, 24, were charged with involuntary manslaughter. Dave Halls, 63, serving as the first assistant director on the film, entered a no-contest plea in accordance with a deal made with prosecutors, accepting responsibility for the misdemeanour offence of negligent use of a deadly weapon linked to the death of Halyna Hutchins. Numerous civil suits have also been filed, with accusations of negligence being levelled against several parties, including the production company itself, Hannah Gutierrez and actor Alec Baldwin.

In this first of two parts, you will learn about the tragic trail of events leading up to the shooting.

Sources:

Alec Baldwin “Rust” shooting: A timeline of events in Halyna Hutchins’ death | CBS News

Rust shooting incident

Rust shooting ‘43rd fatal incident on US film set since 1990’

Film set fatalities rise in last decade as production booms

On-set deaths from prop guns are rare — but not unheard of

Safety for Sarah

Directors Guild of Canada

Safety Bulletins – Contract Services

01_safety_bltn_firearms

02_safety_bltn_live_ammunition

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices