Episode 126 – On the morning of June 18, 1906, on the trail on the west side of the Two-Mile House, a drinking establishment outside Hazelton, B.C., the body of local tough guy, Alex McIntosh, was found. He had been ambushed and shot through the back. A short time later on the trail to the east of the Two-Mile House, the body of a labourer, Max Leclair, was discovered. He’d died in exactly the same manner. As McIntosh and an indigenous business man named Simon Peter Gunanoot had had a brutal fight only hours prior, suspicion fell on Gunanoot.

When the posse went to arrest him he had already taken off into the wilderness and would lead police on the most expensive manhunt in B.C. history. Gunanoot managed to evade capture for over a decade and was not brought in until he was ready to turn himself in.

Sources:
[Simon Gunanoot – Chasing Shadows by Monty Bassett]
[Hazelton, British Columbia, Canada]
[Kispiox Band Site]
[Gitxsan Nation Site]
[Emily Carr paintings near Kispiox – Contact Sheet]
[Simon Gunanoot – Wikipedia]
[Newspapers.com search – Simon Peter Gunanoot in Canada]
[Echoes of British Columbia by Robert Budd – goodreads.com]
[My Country by Pierre Berton – goodreads.com]
[100 years since the surrender of Simon Gunanoot – BC Local News]
[The man who stayed invisible for thirteen years | Maclean’s | JULY 5, 1958]
[HistoricPlaces.ca – Simon Gun-an-noot’s Grave]

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Episode 125 – On cold December night just before Christmas in 1974, the 14-year-old son of Moncton, NB restauranteur, Cy Stein was kidnapped from the family home by two masked gunman. By just before 5:00am the kidnapping came to and end, but two city of Moncton police officers had then gone missing. Their fate would not be known for two more days, and the outcome was not positive.

Sources:
Regina v. Hutchison, 1975 CanLII 1280 (NB CA)
Ambrose v. The Queen, 1976 CanLII 201 (SCC), [1977] 2 SCR 717

More sources and further reading at darkpoutine.com

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Episode 124 – Women and girls, many indigenous have been going missing in the area of Northern British Columbia’s Highway 16 since 1969. The route has become known as the Highway of Tears. Many have been found deceased and still others have just vanished. In this episode we cover the murders of Jill Stuchenko, Natasha Montgomery, Cynthia Maas and Loren Leslie. All four were killed over a span of 14 months by a violent and cold blooded monster with a baby face, a serial killer named Cody Alan Legebokoff of Prince George, B.C.

Sources and Further Reading:
[2013 BCSC 2178 (CanLII) | R. v. Legebokoff | CanLII]
[2014 BCSC 315 (CanLII) | R. v. Legebokoff | CanLII]
[2014 BCSC 1636 (CanLII) | R. v. Legebokoff | CanLII]
[2014 BCSC 1746 (CanLII) | R. v. Legebokoff | CanLII]
[2016 BCCA 386 (CanLII) | R. v. Legebokoff | CanLII]
[Legebokoff interview 2 by PGCitizen | Free Listening on SoundCloud]
[goodreads.com – Highway of Tears by Jessica McDiarmid]
[Global News – SEARCH: Legebokoff]
[Legebokoff Trial | Prince George Citizen]
[Legebokoff evidence | Prince George Citizen]
[Who is Cody Alan Legebokoff?  | Globalnews.ca]
[Families of Legebokoff victims give emotional statements at sentencing hearing]
[HighwayofTears.org]
[Home – Highway of Tears Film]
[“Knocking on Heaven’s Door” (cover) by Natasha Montgomery – YouTube]

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Episode 123 – Born during the Great Depression, Ken Leishman was a stylish, good looking guy with a Clark Gable moustache. A married father of 7, he was adventurous, smart, charismatic, creative and enterprising. He used his skill as a small aircraft pilot to earn cash first as a fly in mechanic on prairie farms, then as a king cookery salesman. 

Ken was also deeply in debt, his sales business was failing and he craved an even more lavish lifestyle. To get what he wanted Ken wasn’t above stealing it, but often got caught going back for more. After flying all the way to Toronto to rob banks on two separate occasions Ken was dubbed the Flying Bandit after getting caught during his second failed bank robbery.

After Ken’s release, he had an even more elaborate heist in mind – making off with a few hundred pounds of gold bullion in what would be the greatest gold theft in Canadian history.

Sources:
[Bandit – A portrait of Ken Leishman by Wayne Tefs
[Lost: Unsolved Mysteries of Canadian Aviation by Shirlee Smith Matheson
[In the Mind of a Mountie – Google Play]
[This Was Manitoba: Kenneth Leishman – The Flying Bandit (UPDATED)]
[Ottawa Citizen – Ken Leishman – Google News Archive Search]
[Newspapers.com search – Ken Leishman + Canada]
[Ken Leishman: The Flying Bandit – video dailymotion]
[Ken Leishman: The Flying Bandit – YouTube]
[Court Briefing for 1966 trial of Ken Leishman et al, Winnipeg Gold Heist]
[The Flying Bandit – Winnipeg Free Press]
[Canada history: Mar.1, 1966: the Great Winnipeg Gold Heist – RCI | English]
[The Flying Bandit – Winnipeg Free Press]
[The ‘flying bank robber’ died hard | Maclean’s | DECEMBER 29, 1980]

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